Day 19 – Let it Cro

Ah, advent. That time of year when the shops are filled with the sound of Christmas songs – largely, the very same ones they played when I was a kid. They’re a bit corny, but the familiarity is somehow reassuring. And what better way to learn about this year’s new Cro features than through the words ofContinue reading “Day 19 – Let it Cro”

Day 12 – A long journey to Ethereum signatures

The Ethereum blockchain is essentially a transaction-based state machine. We begin with a blank state, before any transactions have happened on the network, and move into some final state when transactions are executed. The state of Ethereum relies on past transactions. These transactions are grouped into blocks and each block is chained together with itsContinue reading “Day 12 – A long journey to Ethereum signatures”

Day 11 – Unix philosophy without left-pad, Part 2: Minimizing dependencies with a utilities package

In the previous post, I made a case for why programming languages should have a utility library that provides small-but-commonly-needed functions. Today I’m introducing a Raku package that I hope will fill that gap and discussing how this fits with the Unix philosophy

Day 6 – Following the Unix philosophy without getting left-pad

The Unix philosophy famously holds that you should write software that “does one thing, and does it well”. But following that advice too literally can lead to the micro-package dystopia that got us left-pad. But there is a way to write libraries that do only one thing without getting left-pad

RFC 84 by Damian Conway: => => =>

RFC 84 by Damian Conway: Replace => (stringifying comma) with => (pair constructor) Yet another nice goodie from Damian, truly what you might expect from the interlocutor and explicator! The fat comma operator, =>, was originally used to separate values – with a twist. It behave just like , operator did, but modified parsing toContinue reading “RFC 84 by Damian Conway: => => =>”

RFC 5, by Michael J. Mathews: Multiline comments

This is the first RFC proposed related to documentation. It asks for a common feature in most of the modern programming languages: multiline comments. The problem of not having multi-line comments is quite obvious: if you need to comment a large chunk of code, you need to manually insert a # symbol at the beginningContinue reading “RFC 5, by Michael J. Mathews: Multiline comments”

RFC 225: Superpositions (aka Junctions)

Damian Conway is one of those names in the Perl and Raku world that almost doesn’t need explaining. He is one of the most prolific contributors to CPAN and was foundational in the design of Raku (then Perl 6). One of his more interesting proposals came in RFC225 on Superpositions, which suggested making his PerlContinue reading “RFC 225: Superpositions (aka Junctions)”